Information about archiving agencies

The term 'Archiving Agency' represents an initiative that is running a programme for the long-term archiving of e-journals. Each participating agency is making metadata on the journals in their programme available to the Keepers Registry. The data supplied by the agencies is linked to the authoritative bibliographic information obtained from the ISSN Register.

The Keepers Registry is collecting data from the following archiving agencies.

Each participating agency has provided a description of their organisation's approach to highlight the different operating models, approach to preservation and access conditions. In order to understand each archiving agency in detail, it is recommended that you visit each initiative's website directly.

Archiving agencies were asked to provide the following information:

  • Overview and background: A short descriptive background to the archiving initiative.
  • Ingest and preservation workflow: The steps taken to ingest content and preserve it over time.
  • Library access to content: In general terms, the conditions under which a library can access the content archived for each initiative.
  • Auditing of content, policies and procedures (both internal and external activities): The steps taken to ensure the ongoing authenticity and accessibility of content and to monitor the development of the approach over time.

In addition, the Keepers Registry has supplied the following information for each agency.

  • Latest data: The archiving agency holds the most up-to-date information on the inclusion of titles and volumes. In this field we link directly to the archiving agency's holdings information, or to the archiving agency's home page if the holdings information is not available.
  • Archiving agency dataset last received: The date that the Keepers Registry most recently retrieved holdings information from the archiving agency.

Archaeology Data Service

Website URL
Overview and background

The Archaeology Data Service (ADS) is a digital archive that supports research, learning and teaching with freely available, high quality and dependable digital resources. It does this by preserving digital data in the long term, and by promoting and disseminating a broad range of data in archaeology.

Since 1996 the ADS has provided long-term archiving for multiple forms of data currently comprising around a million individual items generated from archaeological research around the world. ADS holdings include archive and dissemination versions of a number of archaeological journals and the e-Journal Internet Archaeology. Following internationally recognised best practice in the field of digital archiving, the ADS has developed robust, scalable and reliable internal systems and external partnerships that ensure deposited data is both safe in the long run and permanently available to interested users both within academia and beyond. The ADS was awarded the Data Seal of Approval in 2010 and in 2012 won the DPC's Decennial award for the most outstanding contribution to digital preservation of the last decade.

Ingest and preservation workflow

The ADS follow the Open Archival Information System (OAIS) reference model for digital preservation, ISO (14721:2003), and operate a mix of manual and automated ingest procedures. Long term preservation and access is ensured by rigorous internal procedures and close collaboration with partners in the UK Data Archive. Full details of ADS preservation policy and practice are available here: http://archaeologydataservice.ac.uk/advice/preservation.

Library access to content

Access to all ADS holdings is unrestricted and without charge for all users subject to ADS's Terms of Use and Access http://archaeologydataservice.ac.uk/advice/termsOfUseAndAccess.
This prohibits commercial reuse of material and requires non-commercial reuse to apply appropriate attribution both to the original depositor and to the ADS.

Auditing of content, policies and procedures (both internal and external activities)

ADS preservation policy is under constant review as part of our commitment to long-term access. Content is managed within the ADS via a bespoke Content Management System designed specifically for ADS holdings and the OAIS reference model. The ADS was awarded the Data Seal of Approval (DSA) in March 2011 (http://assessment.datasealofapproval.org/seals/). This demonstrates the robustness and sustainability of our archival processes. The ADS is an associate member of the Digital Preservation Coalition (DPC) (http://www.dpconline.org/)

Frequency of the Keepers Registry updates
Monthly
Latest data
Archiving agency dataset last received
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British Library

Website URL
Overview and background

The British Library has developed a fully scalable, fault tolerant, highly reliable, highly resilient storage system which guarantees the integrity and authenticity of the digital material that is deposited in it. This solution enables us to preserve digital content that we collect but also material that we create, such as digitised collections. The store is an important component of our e-Legal Deposit infrastructure. Under long-standing Legal Deposit legislation, the British Library receives a copy of every printed publication produced in the UK and Ireland. The Legal Deposit Libraries Act 2003 extended this legislation to non-print materials and the Legal Deposit Libraries (Non-Print Publications) Regulations 2013 enshrined the principle that electronic or e-publications and other non-print materials will be deposited in the Library

These publications are saved as part of the published archive, to become an important resource for future generations of researchers and scholars.

Following the Legal Deposit Libraries (Non-Print Publications) Regulations 2013 coming into effect, we continue to work closely with the UK publishing community to collect their electronic content for preservation.

The technical architecture of the digital library system has been developed to enable the British Library to collect and ingest electronic content and for this content to be shared, where permitted, between the Legal Deposit Libraries. All content is replicated to a minimum of two sites.

Ingest and preservation workflow
This information is not yet available
Library access to content
This information is not yet available
Auditing of content, policies and procedures (both internal and external activities)
This information is not yet available
Frequency of the Keepers Registry updates
Monthly
Latest data
This information is not yet available
Archiving agency dataset last received
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Cariniana Network

Website URL
Overview and background

The Cariniana Network is a distributed preservation network, funded by the Brazilian government, which provides long term preservation and access for Brazil’s scientific publications.

The Cariniana Network's parent organisation is the Brazilian Institute of Information in Science and Technology (IBICT), which was originally established by the Brazilian government in the 1950s, and plays a key role in promoting effective production, management and dissemination of information.

Ingest and preservation workflow

The Cariniana Network uses a Private LOCKSS Network, and subscribes to the LOCKSS Alliance. All the journals that have been preserved in the Network have been registered voluntarily at IBICT's open access services. IBICT has had an agreement with the Public Knowledge Project to collaborate with the dissemination of the OJS platform nationwide since 2008. More than a thousand Brazilian journals have signed the manifest page for the preservation of their volumes in our Network. Guidelines instructing publishers on the rights and obligations of being part of the Network are published on the Cariniana Network Portal: http://cariniana.ibict.br/index.php/publicacoes/item/72-guia-de-preservacao-digital-de-periodicos-eletronicos-na-rede-cariniana.

Library access to content

The Cariniana Network is a dark archive. All the material at the Cariniana Network is open access and once triggered, content will be made accessible under the same terms as originally published.

Auditing of content, policies and procedures (both internal and external activities)

The Cariniana Network follows the model of the LOCKSS Alliance and it has established guidelines and periodical updating of its recommendations for all its institutional partners. The Internal Management Committee is responsible for periodically reviewing the network policies, including recommendations of specific accepted and recommended technologies, as well as the necessary procedures.

The Network services and products are designed to ensure that the Network partners responsibly safeguard copies of the content in independently administered LOCKSS boxes. A small number of representatives of those institutions have controlled access and they participate in independent verification of the integrity of the Cariniana archives, enabling the Internal Management Committee to validate the technical decisions that have been taken over time.

Frequency of the Keepers Registry updates
Monthly
Latest data
Archiving agency dataset last received
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CLOCKSS Archive

Website URL
Overview and background

The CLOCKSS (Controlled Lots of Copies Keeps Stuff Safe) Archive is a not-for-profit, dark archive, that preserves digital scholarly materials for the very long term, through a global and geopolitically distributed network of archive nodes. Founded by the world's leading libraries and publishers, The CLOCKSS Archive has achieved a unique consensus among publishers, who agree to make their content available for free in the case that they can no longer supply it. CLOCKSS is governed transparently and democratically by all participants and represents the shared values of the entire community.

Ingest and preservation workflow

The CLOCKSS Archive ingests and preserves the publisher's precise original artifact (both presentation and source files) in 12 archive nodes around the globe. Using the award-winning LOCKSS technology, content is preserved at the bit level. The globally and geopolitically diverse distribution of archive nodes protects the content from man-made and human misfortune. Format migration techniques ensure that the most up-to-date technology is used when required to make the content available to readers.

Library access to content

When content is not available from a publisher (a "trigger event"), CLOCKSS makes it freely available to everyone on the web, under a Creative Commons license. All libraries around the world will thus have access for free, obviating the cost and complication of authentication and authorization. CLOCKSS guarantees that open-access content remains open access after a "trigger event".

Auditing of content, policies and procedures (both internal and external activities)

Audits happen at many levels. INTERNAL: The CLOCKSS Archive uses the LOCKSS open source software, an award winning preservation protocol that ensures the authenticity of preserved content at every level from the bits, to file formats, to human error and malfeasance. The CLOCKSS Archive Executive Committee and the Co-Chairs of the Board meet regularly to review finances, policies, and procedures with the Executive Director. The CLOCKSS Board of Directors and several worldwide Advisory Councils groups also meet regularly as part of routine governance and development processes. EXTERNAL: The Archive technology adheres to the security standards of the U.S. Federal Government. The Center for Research Libraries conducted an audit of CLOCKSS in 2013-2014. The CRL certification panel concluded that CLOCKSS can be recognized by its designated community as a trustworthy repository. The panel gave CLOCKSS its highest rating for Technologies, Technical Infrastructure, Security. See http://www.crl.edu/reports/clockss-audit-report-2014.

Frequency of the Keepers Registry updates
Quarterly
Latest data
Archiving agency dataset last received
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e-Depot

Website URL
Overview and background

The e-Depot is a digital archiving environment that ensures long-term access to digital objects.

The KB's e-Depot aims to ensure the research community perpetual access to the published records of the arts, humanities and social sciences, science, technology and medicine, and the digital cultural heritage. The KB ensures publishers, libraries and end users that the information stored in the repository will outlast the transience of digital information carriers. In addition, the e-Depot offers publishers a durability check on archived formats as well as guidance on how to create the most durable electronic publications. As of November 2007, the e-Depot has ingested more than 10 million digital objects, mostly publications by international publishers.

Ingest and preservation workflow
This material is archived in the KB e-Depot.
Library access to content
Licensed content can only be accessed onsite at the KB. Open access and triggered content is freely available via the online e-Depot portal.
Auditing of content, policies and procedures (both internal and external activities)
KB is building a new e-Depot system. For that reason this information will be available after 2013.
Frequency of the Keepers Registry updates
This information is not yet available
Latest data
Archiving agency dataset last received
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Global LOCKSS Network

Website URL
Overview and background

The Global LOCKSS Network preserves today's e-journals and e-books for tomorrow's readers. The Global LOCKSS Network is a proven preservation approach that uniquely empowers both libraries and publishers. It enhances a library's value by restoring library collections via a locally installed "LOCKSS box", essentially a digital bookshelf. Payments are separated from access and perpetual access is guaranteed. The Global LOCKSS Network enhances a publisher's value by preserving the original published artifact (what the readers see), including branding and historical context and underlying files as supplied. It protects a publisher's business model by driving all reader traffic to their web site. The Global LOCKSS Network is administered and managed by the Stanford University Libraries LOCKSS Program. See the LOCKSS Program website for additional information, http://www.lockss.org/lockss/Home

Ingest and preservation workflow

The Global LOCKSS Network protects digital content against a wide range of technical, social, and management threats. The content and associated metadata are ingested and thoroughly tested to ensure the content's authenticity. The Global LOCKSS Network is format agnostic, with a proven file format migration framework to ensure content remains accessible and useable. The material is preserved for the long term in a robust fault- tolerant network. See the LOCKSS Program web site, "How It Works," for additional information, http://www.lockss.org/lockss/How_It_Works

Library access to content

Authorized readers at participating institutions access content from an institution's LOCKSS box whenever the content is unavailable from the original publisher's web site. The Global LOCKSS Network provides continual access as well as perpetual access. The LOCKSS system uniquely preserves the content at the original URL with all original bibliographic metadata so that content can be easily located by web search engines, library catalogs, and all bibliographic services. Integration with Open URL link resolvers such as SFX, 360 Link, and Cufts is underway. See the LOCKSS Program website for additional information, http://www.lockss.org/lockss/How_It_Works#Providing_Access

Auditing of content, policies and procedures (both internal and external activities)

The LOCKSS Program's Global LOCKSS Network builds and uses open source software, enabling the community to quickly identify and correct inevitable software bugs. An award winning preservation protocol ensures the authenticity of LOCKSS preserved content. As required for systems, which are tamper evident, the Global LOCKSS Network is preserving at least seven copies of the content, with each copy held in an independently administered LOCKSS box. The Library of Congress and the LOCKSS Program staff have completed the Certification and Accreditation process under the Federal Information Processing Standard for categorizing security risks of federal information and systems (FIPS 199). A CRL TRAC test audit of LOCKSS can be found at http://www.crl.edu/content.asp?l1=13&l2=58&l3=142&l4=71
For more information, please see: http://www.lockss.org/lockss/How_It_Works#Auditing

Frequency of the Keepers Registry updates
Monthly
Latest data
Archiving agency dataset last received
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HathiTrust

Website URL
Overview and background

HathiTrust is an international partnership of academic and research institutions (see http://www.hathitrust.org/community for a list of all partners). The institutions own and operate a collaborative digital repository, created to preserve and provide access to millions of volumes digitized from their library collections and other sources.

The digital repository is designed according to the framework for Open Archival Information Systems (OAIS) to fulfill ingest, archival storage, data management, and access functions for large (millions of volumes) amounts of material. This design is realized within the context of community-wide standards and criteria for Trustworthy Digital Repositories.

Ingest and preservation workflow

There are two parts to repository ingest: ingest of bibliographic data and ingest of digital content files. Bibliographic data is used in content discovery and rights management strategies. Content files include a limited number of standard, open, image and textual formats that undergo rigorous validation and integrity checks on ingest.

The repository comprises two synchronized instances of active storage with wide geographic separation, and encrypted tape backup with 6 months of previous-version retention in a third location. All storage is physically secure, locked in racks within data centers that are accessible only to authorized personnel. See http://www.hathitrust.org/technology for more information.

Library access to content

HathiTrust offers viewing, downloading, and bibliographic and full-text searching options for public domain and open access content in the repository. Bibliographic and full-text searching options are available for in copyright volumes. Specialized features are also available to facilitate access by persons who have print disabilities, and allow users to gather subsets of the digital library into personal collections that can be searched and browsed. See http://www.hathitrust.org/access for more information.

Auditing of content, policies and procedures (both internal and external activities)

HathiTrust conducts regular audits that verify the integrity of preserved files, and the correspondence of digital files to both bibliographic and rights information, and information stored in indexes used for bibliographic and full-text search. Active use of content for display and searching purposes provides an additional check on content integrity.

HathiTrust was certified in 2011 by the Center for Research Libraries for compliance with the Trustworthy Repository Audit and Certification criteria (see http://www.hathitrust.org/trac).

Frequency of the Keepers Registry updates
Monthly
Latest data
Archiving agency dataset last received
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Library of Congress

Website URL
Overview and background

The Library of Congress is the United States' oldest federal cultural institution and serves as the research arm of Congress. It is also the largest library in the world, with millions of books, recordings, photographs, maps and manuscripts in its collections. The Library's mission is to support the Congress in fulfilling its constitutional duties and to further the progress of knowledge and creativity for the benefit of the American people.

In 2010, the Copyright regulation governing mandatory deposit was revised to allow the Library to demand serials published online only. As a result, the Library has been building a growing collection of eSerials which has been increasing exponentially.

Ingest and preservation workflow
The Library receives content as network transfers and on physical media. For both mechanisms the Library has put in place a series of workflows, some media-based and some project-based. The workflows are instantiated as XML and operated through a workflow engine in the Library's Content Transfer Services (CTS). Each workflow includes human-operated and machine-operated steps, and includes copying onto Library hardware, malware scanning, fixity checking, fixity creation if none were provided, and copying to the appropriate Library server location, including processing space, delivery space, and long-term storage. Appropriate inventory records and actions/events are recorded.
Library access to content
This digital content is available to authorized users onsite at the Library of Congress.
Auditing of content, policies and procedures (both internal and external activities)
All ingested files have fixities recorded upon ingest, and auditing processes and reports are in place for the periodic checking of files.
Frequency of the Keepers Registry updates
Monthly
Latest data
Archiving agency dataset last received
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National Science Library, Chinese Academy of Sciences

Website URL
Overview and background

In co-operation with other national library and information institutions, NSLC developed its digital information preservation strategy to cover major e-journal resources from important specialized scientific societies or special STM publishers, and to cover, cooperatively with other institutions, some general STM e-journal and e-book resources. It builds on an internal archive system with remote backups, and on an external national network of archives with proper division of labour and co-operation.

Ingest and preservation workflow

NSLC implements a FTP-based ingesting process from publishers, and carries out a series of checks during ingest, including Submission Information Package (SIP) register; virus checking, malicious code detection; format and integrity check, inventory data check; , metadata extraction; SIP to Archival Information Package transfer.

Library access to content

When content is not available from a publisher (defined by trigger events in the preservation agreements with publishers), NSLC will provide access from the archive to the original range of users defined in the original subscription licenses, between NSLC and publishers, which provide the basis for the preservation agreements.

Auditing of content, policies and procedures (both internal and external activities)

INTERNAL: NSLC regularly audits archived data via bit integrity checking and via random verification of preserved content. NSLC also periodically conducts reviews of strategies, policies, management arrangements, administrative processes, and human and financial investment.

EXTERNAL: Regular audits by a third party expert group from the National Science and Technology Libraries Group and the Chinese Academic Library and Information System are carried out.

Frequency of the Keepers Registry updates
Quarterly
Latest data
This information is not yet available
Archiving agency dataset last received
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PKP PLN

Website URL
Overview and background

The PKP PLN is a not-for-profit dark archive. The PKP PLN will preserve content of any journal using Open Journal Systems (OJS), regardless of where it is hosted and who publishes the journal. It leverages the distributed preservation network model employed by a Private LOCKSS Network supported by the organizational commitment of PKP partners and sponsors who are also members of the LOCKSS Alliance. More information is available at: https://pkp.sfu.ca/pkp-lockss/.

Ingest and preservation workflow

The key feature of the PKP PLN is to make the ingest and preservation workflow as fully automated as possible. This is enabled by the use of a special OJS plugin that can be activated by the OJS journal manager. Upon publication, journal issues are automatically deposited into the distributed LOCKSS network of participating nodes.

Library access to content

The PKP PLN is a dark archive. After a trigger event, the PKP PLN makes journal content freely available to anyone on the web, under the same terms by which it was originally published. In order to participate, the journal manager must agree in advance to make the content accessible in the PKP PLN.

Auditing of content, policies and procedures (both internal and external activities)

The PKP PLN relies upon the proven LOCKSS preservation technology and their ongoing commitment to robust standards and protocols. The PKP PLN will utilize a combination of various oversight groups - the PKP Advisory Committee, the PLN Advisory Panel, and the participating nodes - to periodically review and adjust the policies, procedures, and operations of the network.

Frequency of the Keepers Registry updates
Monthly
Latest data
Archiving agency dataset last received
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Portico

Website URL
Overview and background
Portico preserves e-journals, e-books, and other electronic scholarly content to ensure researchers and students will have access to it in the future. Portico's approach to digital preservation is comprehensive - combining long-term content management and organizational commitment with a philosophical dedication to addressing the needs of tomorrow's scholars. More information is available at the Portico website (http://www.portico.org/digital-preservation/).
Ingest and preservation workflow
Portico's preservation process includes preservation planning, receipt & inventory management, processing & archival deposit, monitoring & management, and content delivery. More information is available in the Portico Preservation Step-by-Step guide (http://www.portico.org/digital-preservation/services/preservation-approach/preservation-step-by-step/#step1).
Library access to content
Faculty, staff, and students at participating institutions can access the archive to use content that has experienced a trigger event or that fulfills a post-cancellation access claim. More information is available on the Portico website (http://www.portico.org/digital-preservation/services/reliable-access/).
Auditing of content, policies and procedures (both internal and external activities)
Participating libraries and publishers are granted password access to archived content for verification and auditing purposes (auditor access is provided at http://www.portico.org/digital-preservation/the-archive-content-access/audit-the-archive/). Portico is committed to certification by external organizations and in 2010, Portico became the first digital preservation service to be independently audited by the Center for Research Libraries (CRL) and subsequently certified as a trusted, reliable digital preservation solution that serves the needs of the library community. More information is available on the Portico website (http://www.portico.org/digital-preservation/the-archive-content-access/archive-certification/).
Frequency of the Keepers Registry updates
Monthly
Latest data
Archiving agency dataset last received
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Scholars Portal

Website URL
Overview and background
Scholars Portal is a shared IT service provider that preserves and provides access to information resources collected and used by the 21 university library systems in the Ontario Council of University Libraries. Scholarly material licensed by OCUL schools is locally loaded on the journals platform, which provides perpetual access to the content (both locally and on vendor platforms), and holds it in an OAIS-compliant preservation infrastructure.
Ingest and preservation workflow
Scholars Portal receives content directly from publishers. Upon receipt, the content is verified and then normalized, where appropriate. This normalization allows for a consistent user experience, and keeps the character of the collection as consistent as possible in order to make the materials contained more preservable. The files comprising every object in the repository are accounted for: file formats are tracked, fixity values calculated and checked regularly, and significant events in the history of the file are recorded. Scholars Portal closely tracks its community's needs to ensure that the material in the repository is usable, and will transform into new formats any files that risk becoming unusable by OCUL members.
Library access to content
Scholars Portal is OCUL's "light archive" for scholarly journal content. Content deposited into the repository, with few exceptions, is made available immediately to the OCUL members with a valid license. In a limited number of cases, content providers have designated Scholars Portal as a "dark archive", holding material in the repository that cannot be accessed, in the event that certain mutally agreed-upon trigger events occur. These events are similar to other dark archiving services, and center around the provider's inability to continue to provide access to the content themselves.
Auditing of content, policies and procedures (both internal and external activities)

Scholars Portal is directly answerable to the directors of the 21 OCUL libraries through a series of committees that guide specific aspects of the repository's operation. These representative committees are composed of experts from the OCUL community, and ensure that Scholars Portal operations are directly meeting the needs of the community, and that the content in the repository remains usable.

In addition to verification of file validity and regular verification of fixity values, Scholars Portal's role as a light archive means that patrons at OCUL institutions are constantly reviewing the content in the repository. Scholars Portal provides numerous feedback mechanisms to report missing or corrupt content, and this level of use ensures that the repository always has a view of the content's usability.

In February 2013, Scholars Portal was certified as a Trustworthy Digital Repository by the Center for Research Libraries. The results of this audit can be found at http://crl.edu/archiving-preservation/digital-archives/certification-and-assessment-digital-repositories/scholars_portal

Frequency of the Keepers Registry updates
Monthly
Latest data
Archiving agency dataset last received
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Swiss National Library

Website URL
Overview and background

The Swiss National Library collects and archives everything about Switzerland; everything which is published in the country or written by Swiss authors. Every publication, from Swiss daily newspapers to novels, from documentaries and yearbooks to official publications and geographical maps.

The mandate of the Swiss National Library about collecting, listing, preserving as well as making available Helvetica to the public is described in the law on the Swiss National Library SR 432.21. The mandate includes digitally born publications such as, for example, e-books, e-journals and websites.

e-Helvetica is the Swiss National Library's service working on safeguarding Switzerland's digital cultural heritage over the long term and ensuring that it remains accessible to future generations. The goals of e-Helvetica are to create the frameworks for collecting, recording, making available and sustainably preserving electronic Helvetica and to establish digital archives for electronic publications. As well as constructing a technical platform for long-term archiving, cooperation with various partner institutions is essential to the development of the collections.

The Swiss National Library's digital collections contain today commercial publications, monographs, periodicals, websites, theses and official publications. Websites and theses are included in cooperation with partner institutions.

Ingest and preservation workflow

Ingest handles the reception and the automated preparation of data for long-term archiving. The Ingest process takes over publications intended for the archives from their producer and reviews, prepares and, finally, files them away along with the relevant metadata. In addition, access systems such as the catalogue of the Swiss National Library are updated with information concerning publications newly received by the archives.

The Ingest process comprises a whole series of individual automatic steps:

  1. Data acceptance
  2. Unpack/Decompress data
  3. Convert metadata
  4. Import electronic publications
  5. Quality assurance
  6. Version management
  7. Persistent Identifier / URN
  8. Checks, completeness
  9. Feed into systems
  10. Cleanse

For more details check the webpage at http://www.nb.admin.ch/nb_professionnel/01693/01696/01876/01877/01880/index.html?lang=en.

Library access to content

A full-text search (Solr / Lucene ) across all the Swiss National Library's digital collection is available in e-Helvetica Access. The advanced full-text search allows filtering of results by books, journals, websites or university publications. Other filters are also available in the advanced full-text search e.g. language, year, Dewey. Full-text search results may also be refined through facets e.g. place of publication, year of publication, language, type of publication and availability.

Access rights to digital publications are also managed in e-Helvetica Access. A digital publication's accessibility is indicated via a traffic light display: green indicates that it is freely available for consultation, orange that there are restrictions applied (on-site access at the Swiss National Library only) and red that it is not available.

Metadata search is still carried out in the library's catalogue, Helveticat. Links in the Helveticat records connect directly to the appropriate title in e-Helvetica Access.

Auditing of content, policies and procedures (both internal and external activities)

The Swiss National Library is building a new Repository that will replace the existing storing system. Information on auditing, policies and procedures will be provided as soon as the new Repository is in place.

Today the Swiss National Library uses a redundant NAS system (Network Attached Storage) for long-term storage of its digital publications. The two NAS filers are situated at two locations in Bern. Automatic data replication between the two systems ensures that stored data are available in their entirety at both locations. In addition, a tape drive at the secondary location is used to create a third copy of the data on magnetic tape. This third copy is stored separately. The Federal Office of Information Technology, Systems and Telecommunication (FOITT) operates the storage system.

Frequency of the Keepers Registry updates
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Latest data
Archiving agency dataset last received
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